doughy / Soup like things

Dilly Stew with Rosemary Dumplings (originally from Isa Does It)

Well I got married 11 days ago, and so many amazing gifts came out of that incredible day. Including this gem packed recipe book: Isa Does It .

I immediately spent hours with my face pressed into the pages of this book, a relationship formed that I had never experienced with a non-fiction book. This recipe book is heavy with incredible recipes I was dying to try as soon as I cracked it open.

First I tried the Dilly Stew with Rosemary Dumplings, and it was a huge success! I made my dumplings a little big and ended up with 10 rather than 14, but they turned out fluffy and chewy and really really tasty! If you’re feeling like some winter stew with the intense comfort of dumplings, then give this a shot.

Click through here to be taken to the original recipe.

I made my own vegetable broth for this recipe, which added about 90 minutes of prep to the event. While I was making the broth I was able to cook some white beans I reluctantly agreed to include because the recipe calls for it, despite my instinct that the stew would be totally fine without the beans. (You could absolutely skip the beans if you wanted to, they did not make the dish)

Here is the recipe, beginning with ingredients, word for word from Isa:

For the stew:
3 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 cup all purpose flour
1 medium sized sweet onion (like Vidalia or Walla Walla), quartered and thinly sliced
1 teaspoon salt
3 cloves garlic, minced
6 cups vegetable broth, at room temperature
2 stalks celery, tops removed, sliced 1/4 inch thick
1 1/2 pounds potato, in 3/4 inch chunks (peel if they’re russets)
1 cup baby carrots (see note)
1 tablespoon fresh thyme
2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill
1/2 teaspoon sweet paprika
Fresh black pepper
1 15 oz can navy beans, rinsed and drained (about 1 1/2 cups)

For the dumplings:
1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoons dried rosemary, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon salt
3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk (or soy)
2 tablespoons olive oil

First we’re going to make a roux, but it has a little less fat than a traditional roux, which means it doesn’t get as goopy. If you’d like a more traditional roux, just add extra oil.

Preheat a large, heavy bottom pot over medium-low heat.

Add the oil and sprinkle in the flour. Use a wooden spatula to toss the flour in the oil, and stir pretty consistently for 3 to 4 minutes, until the flour is clumpy and toasty.

Add the onion and salt, and toss to coat the onions completely in the flour mixture. As the onions release moisture, they will coat more and more. Cook this way for 5 minutes, stirring often. Add garlic and stir for 30 more seconds or so.

Stream in the vegetable broth, whisking constantly to prevent clumping. Add the celery, potatoes, carrot, dill, thyme, paprika and black pepper, then turn the heat up and cover to bring to a boil. Keep a close eye and stir often, so that it doesn’t clump or boil over.

Once boiling, reduce the heat to a simmer and let cook uncovered for 20 to 25 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the stew is nicely thickened and the potatoes and carrots are tender.

In the meantime, prepare the dumplings.

Sift the flour, baking powder and salt together in a large mixing bowl. Mix in the rosemary. Make a well in the center and add the milk and olive oil. Use a wooden spoon to mix together until a wet dough forms.

When the stew is ready, mix in the beans and plop dough right on top of the stew in spoonfuls. You should get about 14 dumplings. Cover the pot tightly and cook for about 14 more minutes. The dumplings should be nice and firm. Use your ladle to dunk them into the stew to coat.

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